This Week in Arts: ‘Stan & Ollie,’ Winter Jazzfest, Marie Kondo on Netflix | Modern Society of USA

This Week in Arts: ‘Stan & Ollie,’ Winter Jazzfest, Marie Kondo on Netflix

This Week in Arts: ‘Stan & Ollie,’ Winter Jazzfest, Marie Kondo on Netflix

Dec. 28.

John C. Reilly knows the value of a great partnership, and since September he’s doubled up in “Ralph Breaks the Internet” (with Sarah Silverman), “The Sisters Brothers” (Joaquin Phoenix) and “Holmes & Watson” (Will Ferrell).

Now comes “Stan & Ollie,” opening Friday, Dec. 28 in New York and Los Angeles before a national rollout on Jan. 25. In it, Reilly plays the outsize Oliver Hardy to Steve Coogan’s diminutive Stan Laurel, snagging a Golden Globe nomination for best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy.

“Stan & Ollie” has plenty of both — the classic slapstick, the sweetly zany song-and-dance routines — as it follows the legendary duo through variety halls in 1953 Britain while the men try to jump-start their stalled careers. And their bickering wives (Shirley Henderson and Nina Arianda) say what their husbands dare not.

But mostly it shines a light on the tender twilight of Laurel and Hardy’s enduring collaboration, and the hurdles — Hardy’s gambling and poor health, Laurel’s lingering resentment after Hardy briefly went solo — that threatened to stop the show. KATHRYN SHATTUCK

Now, timed perfectly to resolutions season, Netflix is unveiling “Tidying Up With Marie Kondo” on New Year’s Day. In eight episodes, Kondo tutors Americans at pivotal points in their lives — a new marriage, a baby’s arrival, an empty nest, a husband’s death — in her KonMari Method, which advocates simplifying, organizing and storing in five categories (clothing, books, paper, miscellaneous, which she calls komono, and sentimental items). Then there’s folding, folding, folding, accompanied by crying, crying, crying.

“I’m so excited because I love mess,” says an exuberant Kondo, who believes that a clean home results in happier relationships. Now, go thank your stuff and set it free. KATHRYN SHATTUCK

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